Food Hunger 

Eradicating hunger and malnutrition is one of the great challenges of our time. Not only do the consequences of not enough – or the wrong – Lack of food causes suffering and poor health, they also slow progress in many other areas of development like education and employment.

What we do

Clean Water

We Provide clean water for drinking, and irrigation.

Agriculture

We work with local experts to support and train farmers 

Education

We partner with caregivers, teachers, and communities to support children throughout their education

Health

 We work with communities to restore physical health

Invite us to feauture your projects

All Projects for No Hunger in Africa by 2030

Every day too many men and women across the globe struggle to feed their children a nutritious meal. In a world where we produce enough food to feed everyone, 690 million people still go to bed on an empty stomach each night. Acute food insecurity affected 135 million people in 55 countries in 2019. Even more – one in three – suffer from some form of malnutrition.

Eradicating hunger and malnutrition is one of the great challenges of our time. Not only do the consequences of not enough – or the wrong – food cause suffering and poor health, they also slow progress in many other areas of development like education and employment.

In 2015 the global community adopted the 17 Global Goals for Sustainable Development to improve people’s lives by 2030. Goal 2 – no Hunger – pledges to end hunger, achieve food security, improve nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture, and is the priority of the World Food Programme.

Every day, WFP and its partners work to bring us closer to a no hunger world. With our humanitarian food assistance, we provide nutritious food to those in urgent need. Meanwhile our complementary programmes address the root causes of hunger, building the resilience of communities, so we don’t need to keep saving the same lives each year.

 

Years of eradicating hunger

communities bnefitted across the world

Tuendelee Pamoja

To improve food and income security Food Hunger will ensure the adoption of Climate Smart Agriculture by utilizing Farmer-Leader Groups in the Participatory Agricultural Cascade Extension model. To improve income security and social accountability, the project will facilitate the formation of Savings Groups and engage farmers in various value chains. The project will build upon the success of the Care Group model to improve the human capital and resiliency of communities.

Health Care

Strengthen the capacity of at-risk front-line health care workers on infection prevention and control and support under-resourced health care facilities through the provision of supplies and sustainable water, sanitation, and hygiene services for effective COVID-19 risk-mitigation, prevention and response.

Agriculture and Income

Implement, with partners Search for Common Ground and  Development, a comprehensive, integrated project to improve food and nutrition security and enhance resiliency to shocks and livelihoods among vulnerable households

How to end hunger by 2030

To realize the full potential of ending hunger, national governments must expand social protection schemes for the most vulnerable. Providing this opportunity for equitable economic growth will raise the purchasing power of the poorest 2 billion people which in turn will create incremental demand, generating new jobs and jump-starting local economies. Investing in inclusive development isn’t just the right thing to do; it makes good business sense

WALK FOR ZERO HUNGER

Day(s)

:

Hour(s)

:

Minute(s)

:

Second(s)

Our vision: five steps to Hunger Eradication

With a tap on your smartphone you can share your meal with a child in need. It costs only US $0.80 to feed one child for a day.

Pave the road from farm to market

Access to affordable, nutritious food for everyone — all 7 billion of us — is vital. We must innovate and invest in making our supply chains more efficient by developing sustainable durable markets. To support these markets, we must also improve rural infrastructure, particularly roads, storage and electrification, ensuring farmers ability to reach a wider consumer base.

Put the furthest behind first.

To realize the full potential of our globalized economy, national governments must expand social protection schemes for the most vulnerable. Providing this opportunity for equitable economic growth will raise the purchasing power of the poorest 2 billion people which in turn will create incremental demand, generating new jobs and jump-starting local economies. Investing in inclusive development isn’t just the right thing to do; it makes good business sense.

Reduce food waste

About one third of the food we produce each year is lost or wasted, costing the global economy nearly US$ 1 trillion annually. In developed countries food is often wasted on the plate, while in developing countries it is lost during production, as crops go unused or unprocessed because of poor storage or because the farmers cannot get their goods to market.

Encourage a sustainable variety of crops

Today across the globe, four crops (rice, wheat, corn and soy) represent 60 percent of all calories consumed. Addressing the challenges of climate change, and food availability and food access will require helping farmers explore and identify a more diverse range of crops. To achieve this, we must work with farmers ensure they have access to the necessary tools and skills, and build a market by educating communities about the nutritional importance of eating a wide range of foods.

Make nutrition a priority, starting with a child’s first 1000 days

Nothing is more important to the development of a child than good health and nutrition, particularly in the first 1000 days (from conception through to the age of two). To prevent stunting and to promote healthy development, we must ensure that children and nursing mothers have access to the required nutritious foods.